Farewell, Uncle John

John W. Armstrong Obituary [1941-2018]

Master Chief John W. Armstrong (USN ret.) was born in Gulfport MS to Walter Lewis Armstrong, Sr. and Ina Murray-Armstrong on February 20, 1941 and died in San Diego CA on June 11, 2018. John moved to Ellisville MS in 1947 from Woolmarket MS and was raised there by his widowed mother. He attended Sand Hill Grammar School and Ellisville High School. John enlisted in the U.S. Navy at the age of 17 and completed his recruit training in San Diego CA. John progressed from Seaman Recruit to Master Chief during his 30-year Navy career, serving primarily in the Pacific Fleet.

John’s first ship was the U.S.S. James E. Kyes (DD-787). After that tour, John served on the U.S.S. Mansfield (DD-728), where he was wounded in action off the coast of Vietnam and received the Purple Heart. Subsequent ship tours included the U.S.S. Leonard F. Mason (DD-852), U.S.S. Providence (CLG-6), U.S.S. Fort Fisher (LSD-40), U.S.S. Kirk (FF-1087), and U.S.S. Reeves (CLG-24). He was home ported in Japan for 17 years during these tours and completed a shore tour in Orlando RTC FL as a drill instructor and two shore tours in San Diego. John retired in 1988 in San Diego and resided at his home in Chula Vista the remainder of his life. In retirement, John enjoyed attending ship reunions and visiting with his many shipmates. He also worked with Ryder Student Transportation and First Student as a bus driver and contract manager.

John was preceded in death by his parents, two wives [Tsugiyo Ueno-Armstrong and Mitsuko Doi-Armstrong], one brother [Master Chief Walter Lewis Armstrong, Jr. (USN ret.)], three sisters [Flora Marie Armstrong, Dorothy Armstrong-Baugh, and Rebecca Armstrong-Jefcoats], and two nephews [Gary Wendell Jefcoats and John Paul Armstrong]. He is survived by one brother [James Dewey (Jeanette) Armstrong], as well as numerous nephews and nieces. John will be laid to eternal rest at the Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery in San Diego alongside his beloved wife, Mitsuko. Fair winds and following seas, shipmate.

Uncle John was an inspiration for me as a kid and he and my Uncle Louis (as the family wrote it) greatly influenced, by their examples alone, my picking the Naval Academy over the Air Force Academy. I mentioned him in “Starving the Monkeys”:

As my Uncle John, a war veteran Navy Master Chief, once told his newly minted Second Lieutenant nephew, “it is a crime to send untrained men into battle”. In my experience, the Navy and the Marine Corps would not once commit this crime, offering able instruction to all who would learn.

Uncle John taught many. As part of a fleet inspection team, he was also responsible for much of the Pacific fleet’s readiness in his era. He taught my family and me something new each time we talked to him.

We’re going to miss his wisdom.

I Was Born This Way

I was reading the Knuckledraggin’ blog, and Ken had a post up about yet another gender identification crisis. Reading the article I found myself becoming uncharacteristically introspective.

We’ve all heard about gender-neutral, gender-fluid, gender-retro-normative, gender-semi-diplastic-thermoset and so on. I have finally figured out where I fit on the spectrum.

I am coming out today as gender-accelerant.

When men are around me, they feel more masculine. When women are around me they feel more feminine.

Don’t judge me. I was born this way.

Introducing Miles Mathis

It has been a busy year. We sold our place in Georgia, have been banging away at some short-fused client work, moved to Tennessee, and are in the middle of scouting the location for our new facilities. Been too busy to write much, but wanted to take some time for a long-overdue introduction to Miles Mathis, an interesting guy who came to my attention about three years ago.

For those of you who haven’t heard of Miles, here’s a warning: take everything you read about him on the web with a grain of salt. Instead, if thinking-out-of-the-box science and culture are your thing, then do what I do and just read what the man himself says about his ideas. And then, as usual, think for yourself about what he has to say.

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Hurricane Hiatus

Wow, it has been months since posting anything. I’ve been busy with other things and sort of lost track until I started getting emails asking whether I had been taken out by unseemly elements. Out of respect for the judicial process, I had stopped writing about Manassas shenanigans and just kind of fell out of the habit overall. Plus, thanks to the Trumpening, we had a swarm of client deadlines all line up at once there for a while. Now that all this has settled down to a dull roar, accompanied by a train of hurricanes, I can start writing again.

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Colonoscopy!

File this post under the category TMI.

About fifteen years ago, I had my first root canal. Back in the day, root canals were these horrific events. When I finally had one done, it wasn’t a big deal at all, no more than a usual filling. Technology, techniques and materials had advanced so much that it had become a fairly routine procedure. I’ve had two of them now, and the second was even easier than the first.

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SAT Saturday

Yesterday, we took our homeschooled 15-year old daughter to take the SAT in Statesboro on the campus of Georgia Southern. The turnout was enlightening, 80% or more of the test-takers that morning were girls. I’ll drill into the informal stats about the boys in a future piece. For now, think about the future implications of a world in which for every young man graduating with a college degree, there are four or five women. And all of them fully infected with cultural poz, having received regular inoculations of such over a four- or five-year period.

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Happiness Lemonade

Burglary lemons? Make happiness lemonade.

Last week, a friend mentioned to me that he broke his dining room table. I, on the other hand, had a spare dining room table, an enormous monstrosity which was part of the furniture ensemble that filled up my Atlanta McMansion back in the day. Some of the local degenerates stole the companion pieces during our 2015 burglary, so this set was just sitting around taking up space. Since this friend, his brother, and his son have helped me about a billion times over the years, I told him he could have it.

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Trump Week In Review, 14 Apr 2017

As today, Good Friday, we reflect upon perversions of law and justice for the performance of evil on behalf of the base and selfish demands of the Sanhedrin, we find ourselves twelve weeks into the Trumpening. To me, the Trumpening remains more the movement than the man. Making America Great Again means to focus on the burdens of the middle American first, particularly those artificial burdens placed on him to feed his destroyers and to crush his spirit.

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Accidental Elicitation

In our civil affairs series, we’ve pointed out that HUMINT collection skills, including elicitation, can be assisted by the use of video. As described in a new Leech City post, during a casual conversation with a guest speaker before a city council meeting, we accidentally caught some city official “tells” on video. Only later, after reviewing the video for a different matter, did we notice these signals. An accidental elicitation is as good as a deliberate one. The topic: potentially handing over administration of the cash cow water system to a third party. Because of these tells, we’ll be following this transition very closely.

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