Official Lies

If you or I, as private citizens, filed a false tax return or other government document, then we would probably get prosecuted, at least for perjury, and perhaps for fraud and other bad things depending on the circumstances. But what happens when government officials file false documents, and then as a result get access and control over hundreds of thousands of dollars of taxpayer money? Is there even so much as a “bad puppy” stern gaze? Let’s find out.

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Trump Targets Obamacare

I’ve been remiss in giving credit to President Trump (EGK) for his accomplishments against formidable opposition in every direction. Sure, there have been some things that have been disappointing, but the wins are worth the setbacks, and we’re far better off than with HRC. One looming win we’ve got our eye on here is the attack on Obamacare.

As I’ve written here before, Obamacare is arguably the most destructive force ever wielded by the deep state against small businesses. The more one digs into it, the more one finds minefields and booby traps for the unwary, as well as a massive shift of health costs from the irresponsible to the responsible, in addition to the deliberate targeting of small businesses.

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Homeschool CLEP: Macroeconomics

This week, our 16 year old homeschooled daughter body-slammed the Macroeconomics CLEP, earning another three hours of college credit for the whopping cost of less than a hundred bucks. This one is an especially satisfying victory because macroeconomics is one of those voodoo subjects; it isn’t intended to make any practical sense, it is just another way of propagandizing college kids. By testing out of it, she now gets to sidestep what would otherwise be a semester-long exposure to deep state Keynesian poz, including having to write papers on how much the Federal Reserve loves the little children, and why tax policy serves the noble and glorious purpose of herding the ignorant and bumbling populace this way and that for its own good.

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Farewell, Uncle John

John W. Armstrong Obituary [1941-2018]

Master Chief John W. Armstrong (USN ret.) was born in Gulfport MS to Walter Lewis Armstrong, Sr. and Ina Murray-Armstrong on February 20, 1941 and died in San Diego CA on June 11, 2018. John moved to Ellisville MS in 1947 from Woolmarket MS and was raised there by his widowed mother. He attended Sand Hill Grammar School and Ellisville High School. John enlisted in the U.S. Navy at the age of 17 and completed his recruit training in San Diego CA. John progressed from Seaman Recruit to Master Chief during his 30-year Navy career, serving primarily in the Pacific Fleet.

John’s first ship was the U.S.S. James E. Kyes (DD-787). After that tour, John served on the U.S.S. Mansfield (DD-728), where he was wounded in action off the coast of Vietnam and received the Purple Heart. Subsequent ship tours included the U.S.S. Leonard F. Mason (DD-852), U.S.S. Providence (CLG-6), U.S.S. Fort Fisher (LSD-40), U.S.S. Kirk (FF-1087), and U.S.S. Reeves (CLG-24). He was home ported in Japan for 17 years during these tours and completed a shore tour in Orlando RTC FL as a drill instructor and two shore tours in San Diego. John retired in 1988 in San Diego and resided at his home in Chula Vista the remainder of his life. In retirement, John enjoyed attending ship reunions and visiting with his many shipmates. He also worked with Ryder Student Transportation and First Student as a bus driver and contract manager.

John was preceded in death by his parents, two wives [Tsugiyo Ueno-Armstrong and Mitsuko Doi-Armstrong], one brother [Master Chief Walter Lewis Armstrong, Jr. (USN ret.)], three sisters [Flora Marie Armstrong, Dorothy Armstrong-Baugh, and Rebecca Armstrong-Jefcoats], and two nephews [Gary Wendell Jefcoats and John Paul Armstrong]. He is survived by one brother [James Dewey (Jeanette) Armstrong], as well as numerous nephews and nieces. John will be laid to eternal rest at the Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery in San Diego alongside his beloved wife, Mitsuko. Fair winds and following seas, shipmate.

Uncle John was an inspiration for me as a kid and he and my Uncle Louis (as the family wrote it) greatly influenced, by their examples alone, my picking the Naval Academy over the Air Force Academy. I mentioned him in “Starving the Monkeys”:

As my Uncle John, a war veteran Navy Master Chief, once told his newly minted Second Lieutenant nephew, “it is a crime to send untrained men into battle”. In my experience, the Navy and the Marine Corps would not once commit this crime, offering able instruction to all who would learn.

Uncle John taught many. As part of a fleet inspection team, he was also responsible for much of the Pacific fleet’s readiness in his era. He taught my family and me something new each time we talked to him.

We’re going to miss his wisdom.

I Was Born This Way

I was reading the Knuckledraggin’ blog, and Ken had a post up about yet another gender identification crisis. Reading the article I found myself becoming uncharacteristically introspective.

We’ve all heard about gender-neutral, gender-fluid, gender-retro-normative, gender-semi-diplastic-thermoset and so on. I have finally figured out where I fit on the spectrum.

I am coming out today as gender-accelerant.

When men are around me, they feel more masculine. When women are around me they feel more feminine.

Don’t judge me. I was born this way.

Introducing Miles Mathis

It has been a busy year. We sold our place in Georgia, have been banging away at some short-fused client work, moved to Tennessee, and are in the middle of scouting the location for our new facilities. Been too busy to write much, but wanted to take some time for a long-overdue introduction to Miles Mathis, an interesting guy who came to my attention about three years ago.

For those of you who haven’t heard of Miles, here’s a warning: take everything you read about him on the web with a grain of salt. Instead, if thinking-out-of-the-box science and culture are your thing, then do what I do and just read what the man himself says about his ideas. And then, as usual, think for yourself about what he has to say.

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Hurricane Hiatus

Wow, it has been months since posting anything. I’ve been busy with other things and sort of lost track until I started getting emails asking whether I had been taken out by unseemly elements. Out of respect for the judicial process, I had stopped writing about Manassas shenanigans and just kind of fell out of the habit overall. Plus, thanks to the Trumpening, we had a swarm of client deadlines all line up at once there for a while. Now that all this has settled down to a dull roar, accompanied by a train of hurricanes, I can start writing again.

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Colonoscopy!

File this post under the category TMI.

About fifteen years ago, I had my first root canal. Back in the day, root canals were these horrific events. When I finally had one done, it wasn’t a big deal at all, no more than a usual filling. Technology, techniques and materials had advanced so much that it had become a fairly routine procedure. I’ve had two of them now, and the second was even easier than the first.

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SAT Saturday

Yesterday, we took our homeschooled 15-year old daughter to take the SAT in Statesboro on the campus of Georgia Southern. The turnout was enlightening, 80% or more of the test-takers that morning were girls. I’ll drill into the informal stats about the boys in a future piece. For now, think about the future implications of a world in which for every young man graduating with a college degree, there are four or five women. And all of them fully infected with cultural poz, having received regular inoculations of such over a four- or five-year period.

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